The Brief History of a Nut

By Christopher Zoukis

As early as 4000 BC, domesticated almonds were produced and available as a nutritious food.  The Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun, circa 1325 BC, enjoyed almonds so much that he was buried with them.  Almonds imported from the Levant were discovered in his tomb.   Image courtesy golona.blogspot.com

Mentioned many times in the Bible, the almond has had symbolic significance not only to Christians, but to other cultures and religions as well.  To Christians, the nut represented divine favor and divine approval.  And it spoke of the Virgin Mary’s purity, which explained the almond’s presence around the Queen of Heaven in famous works of art, where it was called the vesica piscis.  The Chinese attached the ideas of feminine beauty, fortitude in sorrow and watchfulness to the almond.  While to the Iranians, the almond represented the Tree of Heaven.  And the ancient Phrygians considered the almond the Father of all things, because it was associated with the birth of Attis.  The Romans, on the other hand, believed that almonds imparted the blessings of the gods to any public or private event.  This explained why the Romans threw almonds and not rice at newlyweds.  And, as later evidenced, the Romans discovered a more nefarious use for almonds.  One that had nothing to do with blessing.

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What Do Rich People Buy?

By Christopher Zoukis

Together, these three categories of affluent customers control the bulk of the wealth in the United States, which means in the world. They represent untold buying power. What is even more interesting is how they handle their money. Their perspective of money is as different from the average person’s as their wealth is greater.

For one, the wealthy insist that their money work for them. They utilize their money to make more money. The wealthy want the money they deposit in the bank to draw interest. But they do not view the interest the bank pays as an investment. The same holds true for CDs. CDs are not an investment. To the wealthy, CDs and bank deposits are nothing more than a place where they keep their money until the money can be truly invested in a much more profitable venture.  Image courtesy elephantjournal.com

Wealthy people invest in stocks. They study the stock market and do not depend on hot-tips or touted stocks. Discipline and management are vital aspects of their stock investments. Their risk of loss is low because they buy cheap and sell high, and they accomplish that through sound information and research.

The Money Times, November 2012, reported that rich executives bought the following stocks: Allscripts-Misys, which yielded a 52-week return of 73.1%. Cincinnati Financial, which yielded 25.8% at the end of 52-weeks. Dow Chemical, which provided a 52-week return of 35.2%. Exelixis, which returned 62.9%, and Fortune Brands, which returned 50.4%.

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