Legends

By Christopher Zoukis Image courtesy mrzine.monthlyreview.org According to legend, Stanley Tookie Williams was the co-founder of the Crips.  The legend was nothing more than embellishment, encouraged by Tookie Williams.  The reality of the situation was this:  Raymond, wanting to expand the Crips to the west side of Los Angeles, approached Tookie Williams about running the […]

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Book Proposal

By Christopher Zoukis African-American gangs emerged in the Los Angeles area during the 1920s and 1930s.  By the late 1960s, a gang called the Baby Avenues was created in South Central L.A.  Like the monster Frankenstein, the Baby Avenues were the creation of a single individual – Raymond Washington aka ‘Ray-Ray.’  The Baby Avenues eventually […]

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O. G. Mack

By Christopher Zoukis

In 1993, O.G.Mack formed the East Coast version of the Bloods.  Mack called his organization the United Blood Nation, but most simply referred to it as the East Side Bloods. 

O.G. Mack, whose real name was Omar Portee grew up in the Bronx, where he was raised by his grandmother.  A member of a ruthlessly brutal gang called the One Eight Trey Gangsters, Mack was arrested in 1988 for armed robbery.  He was 16 years old at the time.  Mack spent the next three years in prison, Rikers Island.  After being released in 1991, Mack’s grandmother sent him to California to live with relatives.  Her goal was to separate him from the noxious influence of gangs.  It didn’t work.  Most of his relatives in L.A. were members of the Miller Gangster Bloods.  In no time at all, Mack was neck deep in the L.A. gang culture.  Although he never officially joined the Miller Gangster Bloods, Mack ran with the gang, whose members considered him a Blood.   O. G. Mack / Image courtesy thehoodup.com

Mack returned to the Bronx two years later, in 1993.  He immediately took up where he left off, re-uniting with the One Eight Trey Gangsters.  Impressed by Bloods’ culture in L.A., Mack wasted little time convincing his fellow gangbangers that they should become part of the Blood alliance.  The gangbangers liked what they heard.  The One Eight Trey Gangsters became the One Eight Trey Gangster Bloods. 

A few months later, O.G. Mack was arrested for attempted murder.  While awaiting trial, Mack was again held on Rikers Island, in the George Mochen Detention Center (GMDC), which was also called C-73.  Individuals in GMDC were considered problem inmates and were segregated from the general prison population.  On Rikers Island, where the prison was controlled by the Latino gangs, the independent black gangs found themselves fighting not only the Latino gangs, but also fighting other black gangs because of street grudges that carried over into prison.  Most of these independent black gangs were affiliated with the umbrella alliance known as the African Blood Brotherhood or the Almighty Blood Brotherhood.  Mack, realizing that the independent black gangs in prison needed a way to protect themselves from the Latino gangs, called for a meeting of independent black gang leaders.  Mack’s idea, which he presented to the leaders, was to unite as a set of the Bloods.  This unity would allow them to successfully defend themselves against the Latino gangs. 

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Blood Alliance

By Christopher Zoukis

Eventually, to protect themselves, the other gangs – the Compton Piru, the Brims near USC, the Swans, and the Bounty Hunters – formed an alliance called the Bloods.  The Bloods alliance was the result of the March 1972 murder of Robert Ballou, Jr.  It happened like this:  after a concert at the Hollywood Paladium, a rat-pack of twenty Crips assaulted a group of teenagers, robbing them of their wallets and jackets.  Robert Ballou, Jr. was one of the teenagers.  Ballou resisted, refusing to surrender his jacket to the Crips.  The Crips proceeded to jump him and beat him to death.   Image courtesy flickriver.com

The brutal murder of Ballou, who was a neutron – a person unaffiliated with a gang – incensed the Compton Piru.  The Piru went to war with the Crips.  Outnumbered, the Piru really had no chance against the superior forces of the Crips.  Realizing they needed help, the Piru approached the Lueders Park Hustlers about an alliance.  The Lueders Park Hustlers agreed to a meeting on Piru Street.  Not being shy, the Piru also invited every other gang that had grievances against the Crips.  One gang that had a grudge against the Crips was the L.A. Brims.  The Crips had murdered a gangbanger with the nickname of Lil Country, a member of the Brims.  The Denver Lanes and the Bishops sent representatives as well. 

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Bloods

By Christopher Zoukis

A Brief History

According to Julia Dunn, a gang “is an interstitial group, originally formed spontaneously, and then integrated through conflict.” Image courtesy pbs.org The term ‘interstitial’ refers to a culturally isolated or marginalized group of individuals, who, because of external circumstances (racism, lack of education, unemployment), have been left behind.  These individuals adopt a ‘strength through numbers’ attitude, assume collective standards of behavior, develop ad hoc structures of hierarchy and esprit de corps.  They identify with others of similar circumstances and exhibit territorial tendencies. 

After World War I, African-American enclaves sprouted up in the urban areas of major cities with the United States.  In the 1920s, Los Angeles encompassed large black enclaves, where unemployment was prevalent and poverty was the norm.  Within these enclaves, family members and friends banded together into loose, unorganized associations that were, for the most part, non-violent.  For lack of a better term, these associations came to be known as gangs.  The gangs of this historical time were non-territorial.  The primary function of such gangs was to present a ‘tough guy’ image and facilitate the accumulation of easy money by means of prostitution, forgery and theft.

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Book Proposal: Silk

By Christopher Zoukis Silk will peel back the noise and mystique that have grown up around Wayne Perry.  Silk will expose the truth about the most infamous gangster to ever walk the streets of Washington D.C., which is also known as Drama City and/or Chocolate City.  Wayne ‘Silk’ Perry has been called by some the […]

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Plots and Schemes

By Christopher Zoukis On November 16, 1994, Terry Nichols drove to Las Vegas.  He rented storage space into which he placed wigs, masks, panty hose, freeze-dried food and $60,000 worth of gold bullion, silver bars, and jade.  Peter Langan, Leader of the ARA / Image courtesy sipseystreetirregulars.blogspot.com Meanwhile, McVeigh had gone to Pendleton, New York, […]

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Elohim City

By Christopher Zoukis

Located in the foothills of the Ozark Mountains in eastern Oklahoma, Elohim City was founded in 1973 by Robert Millar.  Millar, a former Mennonite preacher from Canada, had converted to Christian Identity.  After his conversion, Millar established Elohim City as an Identity compound, where he and his followers could live in keeping with their beliefs.   Denis Mahon / Image courtesy www.historycommons.org

Essentially, Elohim City was an armed, religious community made up of members of the radical right.  At various times, Elohim City housed members of the Aryan Republican Army; the Covenant, Sword, and Arm of the Lord; the National Alliance; the KKK; the Aryan Nation; and other neo-Nazi groups.  In other words, Elohim City was a bastion for those involved in the militant white power movement.

The Aryan Republican Army (ARA) – about which much more later – was a small gang of estranged, violent, white supremacists, who had read The Turner Diaries, The Silent Brotherhood and Vigilantes for Christendom.  Not only did they read them and believe them, but they adopted the books’ teachings as their motivating ideology.  The ARA modeled their mode of dress, their actions and their organization after Robert Mathews and The Order. 

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The Life and Times of Timothy McVeigh

By Christopher Zoukis

The amount of information available on Timothy McVeigh is mind-boggling.  At least a dozen books have been written on the subject.  Some of these books present a carefully sanitized account of McVeigh’s life and the events surrounding the Oklahoma City bombing.  In other words, there was no conspiracy.  The bombing of the federal building was simply the work of baneful, disaffected die-hards, who lost touch with reality.  Image courtesy www.clarkprosecutor.org

On the other hand, hundreds – if not thousands – of online Websites preach and publish the wildest nonsense imaginable.  Everything from McVeigh’s supposed connection to Middle East terrorist groups to a government conspiracy to blow up one of its own buildings, and then cover it up by laying the blame on a small group of nutcases.  The latter theory was concocted by zealots of the paramilitary and white nationalist groups, in order to keep “those already within the movement circles from jumping ship in disgust at the carnage.”[1]

The truth lies somewhere in between simple and surreal.  There was a conspiracy, but not one by the government.  Rather it was a religious/philosophical conspiracy.  It happened like this:

Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols were misfits.  They didn’t fit in anywhere in normal society.  They felt left behind, disenfranchised by the government and the culture in which they resided.  Because of this, black anger bubbled inside them.  They were angry because they didn’t receive the recognition they believed they deserved.  In effect, they felt unloved and unwanted.  This led to feelings of shame.  And it was the government’s fault.  According to McVeigh and Nichols, the government was conspiring to take away the rights and freedoms of all Americans.  Which meant fear was now added to their shame.  They became paranoid.

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Faith-Washed

By Christopher Zoukis Donald Spitz later told reporters that Paul “died with joy in his heart.  He knew what he did was right, he willingly gave his life for the unborn.”[1] In reality, Paul Jennings Hill was a narcissistic, religious madman.  Mentally and emotionally unstable, he found meaning for his inner emptiness in the zealotry […]

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