Book Proposal

By Christopher Zoukis Killing God’s Enemies relates the origin, history and activities of the church of Christian Identity and its violent outgrowth called the Phineas Priesthood.  In doing so, the book reveals the group’s philosophy of hate; their methodology, which is death to all blacks, Jews, homosexuals and abortionists; and their goal, which is an […]

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Richard Kelly Hoskins and the Phineas Priesthood

By Christopher Zoukis

Richard Kelly Hoskins had the dubious honor of introducing the term “Phineas Priesthood” as the designation for Christian vigilantes who took up arms and avenged “race traitors.”  Image courtesy ebay.com

Hoskins was born in Lynchburg, Virginia.  His parents were religious, strict and insistent upon the superiority of white Southerners.  There was never a doubt that young Richard would play his role well.  After finishing his elementary education, Richard was packed off to an exclusive military academy in Waynesboro, Virginia.  This was in keeping with the grand academic traditions of Southern gentlemen such as Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson. 

Naturally, when the Korean War began, cadet Hoskins fulfilled what was expected of him.  He joined the Air Force, seeing action in Korea.  After his honorable discharge, Hoskins attended Lynchburg College, where he majored in history.  As he steeped himself in world history, Hoskins read and admired the works of Julius Evola.  Evola’s philosophy was rabidly racist and belligerent, and advocated Fascism and Nazism as the only workable forms of government.  Under Evola’s influence, Hoskins turned to neo-Nazism, joining the American Nazi Party. 

Southern gentlemen not only served in the military, but were also expected to be prosperous and good at business.  So after Hoskins graduated from College, he moved to New York City, where family connections landed him a job in a brokerage firm.  Hoskins flourished as an investment broker.  He learned the subtle art of advising others on how to invest their money.  Which meant Hoskins learned how to make money off of other people’s money.

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