ASSORTATIVE MATING: Is there such a thing as a soul-mate or is that just a marketing ploy?

By Christopher Zoukis

No image captures our attention quite like the human face — its ability to communicate is unparalleled.  All of mankind believes they are ‘face readers,’ too.  Phi, or the golden section, would appear to be the universal standard of beauty (whether we like it, or not).  Phi is 1 to 1.618.  Shan Baker, the president of the AAFPRS (American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery) puts it this way:  “While beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, there’s a real mathematical equation for measuring a person’s attractiveness.  In fact, the skeletal proportions are the true determining factors.”  According to the AAFPRS the perfect face looks like this:  high cheekbones and a clear complexion are givens, but the well-proportioned face also divides into equal thirds when lines are drawn through the forehead hairline, the brow, the base of the nose and the edge of the chin.  For women, short, delicate jaws, fine chins and graceful noses, along with prominent eyes, full lips and visible cheekbones.  For men:  broad foreheads, deep-set eyes, imposing brows, and strong jaws make up the most desirable male.  Photo courtesy www.remybumppofieldguide.org

And that, ladies and gentlemen, brings us to the concept of ‘assortative mating,’ i.e., the attraction to others who are like oneself.  “Wanna’ go for a ride?!”  Well, here we go:  most couples, husbands and wives, tend to be similar.  They come from similar religious backgrounds, from similar ethnic backgrounds, have similar levels of innate intelligence, and many similar personality traits, including moral codes.  From whence comes this congruity?

Well, Aristophanes, the comic satirist, presented a unique take on the concept.  It goes like this:  the god, Apollo, divided man into two parts, each part desiring its other half; and once they came together, throwing their arms about each other, they entwined in mutual embraces, longing to once again become one.  Eventually, they were on the verge of dying from hunger and self-neglect, because they did not like to do anything apart from each other.  But when one of them died and the other survived, the survivor sought another mate, man or woman as we call them, and grabbed hold of that. 

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The Career Meter

By Christopher Zoukis

MSN’s homepage recently ran an article about America’s Most Successful Business Women.  On the list were such luminaries as Oprah, Meg Whitman, the novelist Stephenie Meyer (all those Vampire movies).  Even Tom Brady’s supermodel wife made the list.  It seems she’s hecka-good at investing money, which, when you stop and think about it, doesn’t really seem fair.  Not only did she get all the looks, but she got all the brains too.  Image courtesy funadvice.com

I was jealous as jelly, almost had a hissy fit.  It took two pints of Ben & Jerry’s to calm me down.

Prior to the article about Successful Business Women, MSN ran a big feature story on the World’s Richest and Most Successful Men.  The list included business men, sports stars, music recording artists, and Hollywood Moguls.  The thrust of the article was that all these guys had Great Careers.

My name was not on the list.

After sulking for a while, I got to thinking.  How come all these people had Great Careers and I didn’t?  For that matter, how come most people don’t have Great Careers?  In the course of trying to find the answer to my question, I pursued a number of different avenues.  First, I prayed about it, asking for divine enlightenment.  What is commonly referred to as Wisdom.  Nothing happened, no revelation from on high occurred.  Then, since Heaven seemed reluctant to give it up, I had a friend consult the next closest thing:  YouTube.  If you’re looking for the meaning to life, YouTube has a video about it.

Eureka!  Based on

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Barr’s Tips for Success

By Christopher Zoukis

Not long ago, I came across Nine Tips for Success.  The tips were written by Amelia E. Barr, and were included in an essay entitled “Words of Counsel.”  Ms. Barr’s tips are direct and pertinent.  I share them with you in the hope that they may stimulate you to success. 

“Men and women succeed because they take pains to succeed. Industry and patience are almost genius; and successful people are often more distinguished for resolution and perseverance than for unusual gifts. They make determination and unity of purpose supply the place of ability.

Success is the reward of those who “spurn delights and live laborious days.” We learn to do things by doing them. One of the great secrets of success is “pegging away.” No disappointment must discourage, and a run back must often be allowed, in order to take a longer leap forward.

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