What Do Rich People Buy?

By Christopher Zoukis

Together, these three categories of affluent customers control the bulk of the wealth in the United States, which means in the world. They represent untold buying power. What is even more interesting is how they handle their money. Their perspective of money is as different from the average person’s as their wealth is greater.

For one, the wealthy insist that their money work for them. They utilize their money to make more money. The wealthy want the money they deposit in the bank to draw interest. But they do not view the interest the bank pays as an investment. The same holds true for CDs. CDs are not an investment. To the wealthy, CDs and bank deposits are nothing more than a place where they keep their money until the money can be truly invested in a much more profitable venture.  Image courtesy elephantjournal.com

Wealthy people invest in stocks. They study the stock market and do not depend on hot-tips or touted stocks. Discipline and management are vital aspects of their stock investments. Their risk of loss is low because they buy cheap and sell high, and they accomplish that through sound information and research.

The Money Times, November 2012, reported that rich executives bought the following stocks: Allscripts-Misys, which yielded a 52-week return of 73.1%. Cincinnati Financial, which yielded 25.8% at the end of 52-weeks. Dow Chemical, which provided a 52-week return of 35.2%. Exelixis, which returned 62.9%, and Fortune Brands, which returned 50.4%.

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Conspicuous Consumption

By Christopher Zoukis

According to the psychologists we presently reside in an age of diminishing expectations.  And since all of us are products of this enormous bubble called the ‘social reality,’ we don’t expect much.  We actually believe that the future is “selling less of more.”

In other words, we expect little from life, society and our culture.    

            A syllogism:

            The poor get poorer                               

            The rich get richer

            The poor shop at Wal-Mart.

We become self-fulfilling prophecies.  Because we expect little, we get less.  What we get is:  Wal-Mart, Home Depot, Costco, and other retail behemoths.  These monstrosities are the cancers of an economy based upon mass production.  And mass production demands organized consumption and leisure – “the culture of consumption.”

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