Another Look at a Good Book

Image courtesy katu.com By Christopher Zoukis Genghis Khan established a vast empire during the 13th Century.  The Mongol Empire extended from the Dnepr River to the Pacific.  There’s another more contemporary group of Mongols.  It’s an outlaw motorcycle club that originated in December 1969, in a small town called Montebello, which is in Southern California.  […]

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Bloods Redux

By Christopher Zoukis 

History

According to Julia Dunn, a gang “is an interstitial group, original formed spontaneously, and then integrated through conflict.”  The term ‘interstitial’ refers to a culturally isolated or marginalized group of individuals, who, because of external circumstances (racism, lack of education, unemployment), have been left behind.  These individuals adopt a ‘strength through numbers’ attitude, assume collective standards of behavior, develop ad hoc structures of hierarchy and esprit de corps.  They identify with others of similar circumstances and exhibit territorial tendencies.   Image courtesy coolchaser.com

After World War I, African-American enclaves sprouted up in the urban areas of major cities with the United States.  In the 1920s, Los Angeles encompassed large black conclaves, where unemployment was prevalent and poverty was the norm.  Within these enclaves, family members and friends banded together into loose, unorganized associations that were, for the most part, non-violent.  For lack of a better term, these associations came to be known as gangs.  The gangs of this historical time were non-territorial.  The primary function of such gangs was to present a ‘tough guy’ image and facilitate the accumulation of easy money by means of prostitution, forgery and theft.

Well-known gangs of this period – the 1920s and 1930s – included the Goodlows, the Kelleys, the Magnificents, the Driver Brothers, the Boozies and the Bloodgetts.  During the following decade, the 1940s, black gangs increased their numbers, along with their activities, which now included extortion and gambling, in addition to the usual prostitution, forgery and theft.  They provided ‘protection’ for local merchants, which was nothing more than simple coercion.  Merchants paid for the privilege of not having their places of business torched by their so-called protectors.

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BLOOD IN, BLOOD OUT: THE VIOLENT EMPIRE OF THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD

By John Lee Brook

Reviewed by Christopher Zoukis

Notoriety is the substantive form of the adjective ‘notorious,’ which is defined as “widely but unfavorably known or talked about.”  Which means that being notorious is the same thing as being famous, only for all the wrong reasons.  Some obvious examples defining the subtle difference between fame and notoriety would be:  Jesus is famous.  Hitler is notorious.  Mother Theresa is famous.  Lindsay Lohan is notorious.  Yet in today’s world, which espouses an attitude of “there’s no such thing as bad publicity,” the distinction is lax.  It doesn’t seem to matter whether one is famous or notorious.  Either way, one is a celebrity.  Which is what it’s all about.  

Without a doubt, with the publication of Blood In Blood Out, the Aryan Brotherhood (AB) will have attained its highest pinnacle of notoriety or fame or celebrity, depending on your viewpoint.  For this book is bound to make them famously infamous.  Essentially, it is a voyeuristic exhibition of infamy, in which, like a peeping Tom, John Lee Brook gives the reader a view into an extraordinary world.  A world of drugs, money, and violence wrapped around an inner core of mystical warriors.  

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WAYNE ‘SILK’ PERRY (PART 1)

Some people called it Chocolate City.  Others called it Drama City.  ‘It’ was Southwest Washington D.C.  The worst kind of ghetto, made up of tenement houses, fleabag motels, and rat-infested apartment buildings.  Slums didn’t even begin to describe the poverty and squalor of the area.

Chocolate City was where Wayne Anthony Perry was born on November 14, 1962.  He grew up on L Street, in the area called 203.  203 was one of the worst sections of Chocolate City.  It had the worst drug problem, the worst violence and the worst crime.  The people who lived there had two vocational choices:  sports or crime.  Either one might provide a way out of Chocolate City.  Lack of talent and poverty pushed most people to choose crime.

Wayne Perry was good at sports.  So good that he was smooth.  His smoothness earned him the nickname of ‘Silk.’  Bestowed upon him by his half-brother, who was called Lop, the nickname stuck.  From that moment on, everyone knew Wayne Perry as Silk.

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