Dazed and Confused

By Christopher Zoukis

The Mississippi Supreme Court decided not to decide whether Delay could be tried again or not until after he was tried.  The decision was a stroke of genius.  For if Delay was acquitted, there was nothing to decide.  If he was convicted, he could appeal.  If Delay appealed, the court would merely say a murder case that has been dismissed could be retried in good faith, because there was no statute of limitations on murder.   Image courtesy usatoday30.usatoday.com

Delay spent a lot of time shopping for a lawyer.  In the end, he decided on Buddy Coxwell and Jim Kitchens as his defense team.  The prosecutors were Bobby Delaughter and Ed Peters.

The prosecution introduced new evidence, which was that Delay had boasted of killing Medgar Evers to many people over the course of the last three decades.  Klansman Delmar Dennis took the stand and told the jury how Delay had bragged about killing Evers thirty years before.  They also introduced Delay’s admission to the nurse’s aide in prison, that he had killed Evers.  And they linked Delay to the letter published in “The Hoskins Report.”

Déjà vu.  The letter was back. 

The background page of the Anti-Defamation League’s website states that “Hoskins’s writings drew public attention in October 1991, when prosecutors in Mississippi linked white supremacist Byron de la Beckwith to the Phineas Priesthood.”

In other words, for the first time, the general public became aware of the existence of a cluster of violent religious bigots, who killed “for God’s sake.”  

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