Dazed and Confused

By Christopher Zoukis

The Mississippi Supreme Court decided not to decide whether Delay could be tried again or not until after he was tried.  The decision was a stroke of genius.  For if Delay was acquitted, there was nothing to decide.  If he was convicted, he could appeal.  If Delay appealed, the court would merely say a murder case that has been dismissed could be retried in good faith, because there was no statute of limitations on murder.   Image courtesy usatoday30.usatoday.com

Delay spent a lot of time shopping for a lawyer.  In the end, he decided on Buddy Coxwell and Jim Kitchens as his defense team.  The prosecutors were Bobby Delaughter and Ed Peters.

The prosecution introduced new evidence, which was that Delay had boasted of killing Medgar Evers to many people over the course of the last three decades.  Klansman Delmar Dennis took the stand and told the jury how Delay had bragged about killing Evers thirty years before.  They also introduced Delay’s admission to the nurse’s aide in prison, that he had killed Evers.  And they linked Delay to the letter published in “The Hoskins Report.”

Déjà vu.  The letter was back. 

The background page of the Anti-Defamation League’s website states that “Hoskins’s writings drew public attention in October 1991, when prosecutors in Mississippi linked white supremacist Byron de la Beckwith to the Phineas Priesthood.”

In other words, for the first time, the general public became aware of the existence of a cluster of violent religious bigots, who killed “for God’s sake.”  

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BLOOD IN, BLOOD OUT: THE VIOLENT EMPIRE OF THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD

By John Lee Brook

Reviewed by Christopher Zoukis

Notoriety is the substantive form of the adjective ‘notorious,’ which is defined as “widely but unfavorably known or talked about.”  Which means that being notorious is the same thing as being famous, only for all the wrong reasons.  Some obvious examples defining the subtle difference between fame and notoriety would be:  Jesus is famous.  Hitler is notorious.  Mother Theresa is famous.  Lindsay Lohan is notorious.  Yet in today’s world, which espouses an attitude of “there’s no such thing as bad publicity,” the distinction is lax.  It doesn’t seem to matter whether one is famous or notorious.  Either way, one is a celebrity.  Which is what it’s all about.  

Without a doubt, with the publication of Blood In Blood Out, the Aryan Brotherhood (AB) will have attained its highest pinnacle of notoriety or fame or celebrity, depending on your viewpoint.  For this book is bound to make them famously infamous.  Essentially, it is a voyeuristic exhibition of infamy, in which, like a peeping Tom, John Lee Brook gives the reader a view into an extraordinary world.  A world of drugs, money, and violence wrapped around an inner core of mystical warriors.  

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WAYNE ‘SILK’ PERRY (PART 2)

While Alpo was talking himself blue in the face to the feds, Silk was arrested for selling an illegal substance.  Which meant Silk had tried to sell cocaine to an undercover police officer, who arrested him.  The police tossed Silk into Prince George’s County Jail, where he awaited trial.  As Silk cooled his heels in jail, the feds were putting together an air-tight case against him.

When Silk walked into court on December 4, 1992, he expected to plead guilty to one count of selling an illegal substance.  He would receive a fine and a short sentence.  It didn’t happen that way.  Instead, Silk was arrested by the Safe Streets Task Force and charged with the October 23, 1991 murder of Garrett ‘Gary’ Terrell, “in furtherance of a continual criminal enterprise.”

They took Silk back to D.C. and tossed him into jail there. 

On December 5, 1992, the headline of the Washington Timesread ‘Suspected Hitman Arrested in ‘91 Killing.’  The article identified Wayne Perry as the top hitman for the Martinez Organization, a gang that operated in New York, Virginia, Maryland and Washington D.C.  Perry may have been personally responsible for six drug-related murders.  He had been officially charged with the murder of Garrett ‘Gary’ Terrell, who was an infamous drug lord in the D.C. area.

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